Typing through Tin Cans


Typing through Tin Cans is a magazine about modern communication. Vol. 2 features stories by Benedict Evans, Maria Bustillos, and Alexander B. Howard, and an interview with Marty Cooper.

  We Just Clicked -- and then You Left Me How ecommerce lost its humans by Maria Bustillos

 

We Just Clicked -- and then You Left Me

How ecommerce lost its humans

by Maria Bustillos

 

We Talk Pretty One Day: an Interview with Inventor Marty Cooper

BY Claire Willett

We have to come up with new technology that makes data communications much lower in cost, because we’ve got a whole bunch of new things coming. The next big change in communications will be machine-to-machine communications. In healthcare, you’ll measure things on your body every minute, instead of every year or two. We're all going to be connected almost continuously, and that requires a lot of radio waves.

 

READ MORE

 


Editor's Letter

by CLAIRE WILLETT

My dad's first cellphone had a shiny, micro-pebbled black plastic shell, a long antennae, and a matte aquamarine screen. A hideous miracle, I thought. When he was home, the cellphone would sit on the top of his dresser, next to a pile of change and folded scraps of yellow legal paper. To me, the cellphone was an alluringly grown-up accessory, a signifier of import, of having colleagues in sleek suits awaiting your decisions. I wanted, not so much to use it, but to be seen using it. A kid on a cellphone! The very image of it gave me a nice, shivery feeling.  

READ MORE

 

My Double-Edged Web

BY  Alexander B. Howard

Across the United States and world, my love affair with my mobile device has been replicated billions of times. 53% of American adults now have smartphones. 6 billion people around the globe have access to mobile phones. We use them to find information, share what we're seeing, navigate roads, and connect to one another, across time zones, nations and vast oceans.

READ MORE

 

 


Battlefield Screen

BY Benedict Evans

Facebook won on the desktop. All the other rival social networks have disappeared and it now seems very unlikely that another site will come along that does the same thing better, overtaking Facebook the way Facebook overtook Myspace.

But Facebook hasn’t won on mobile.

READ MORE