New York’s Big Datascape, Part 1: Timehop, Parse.ly, Bitly, 10Gen, 2tor


[Image via AllThingsD]

I started writing about innovators in Boston’s big data scene in the earliest days of Riparian. Researching what other companies were building, analyzing, and selling provided me with a narrative to what might otherwise still be a murky set of concepts.  It also introduced me to some fascinating ideas—Bluefin Labs’ TV Genome and Recorded Future’s event forecasting come to mind. And so, nearly two months in to my New York sojourn, I’m expanding this series in the hopes of making the acquaintance of these companies’ NYC equivalents.

Some people like to say that New York and Boston are rivals. When it comes to sports, I think this is valid; when it comes to technology, I think it’s silly. By and large, the technology each city produces serves different sectors—life sciences, healthcare, and higher ed in Boston, fashion, media, finance, and consumer web in New York. Of course, there are exceptions (there are always exceptions)—but exceptions are testaments to heterogeneity, not (usually) harbingers of power shifts. Four of the following companies serve one or more of the city’s main sectors; the fifth serves higher ed, a sector that, especially these days, needs to be better served everywhere.

Timehop

Parse.ly

Bitly

10Gen

  • Product: 10Gen makes MongoDB, which is a distributed database that stores data in JSON/BSON documents (think MySql with a document-based data model).
  • Founders: Dwight Merriman, CEO (@dmerr), Eliot Horowitz, CTO (@eliothorowitz)
  • Technology Used: MapReduce, Aggregation Framework, atomic operations
  • Target industries: Consumer web, Digital Media, Mobile
  • Location: Soho (Also, Palo Alto, CA)
  • Funders: Flybridge Capital Partners, Sequoia Capital, Union Square Ventures 

2tor

 

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